Schlagwort-Archiv: Kritische Ressourcen

Return to Meaning – A Social Science with Something to Say. New Book by Mats Alvesson, Yiannis Gabriel and Roland Paulsen

Sounds like an interesting and relevant piece of work …

„The  explosion  of  published  outputs,  at  least
in  social  science,  creates  a  noisy,  cluttered
environment which makes meaningful research
difficult, as different voices compete to capture
the limelight even briefly.  Publishing comes to
be seen as a game of hits and misses, devoid
of intrinsic meaning and value, and of no wider
social uses whatsoever. Academics do research
in order to get published, not to say something
socially  meaningful.  This  is  what  we  view  as
the  rise  of  nonsense  in  academic  research,
which  represents  a  serious  social  problem.  It
undermines the very point of social science.
This  book  argues  that  we  are  currently
witnessing not merely a decline in the quality
of social science research, but the proliferation
of meaningless research, of no value to society,
and  modest  value  to  its  authors  –  apart  from
securing employment and promotion“

More information at Oxford University Press: www.oup.com

Special Issue on Critical Performativity in M@n@gement

*Special issue – Putting Critical Performativity to work – 20(1)* Available here: http://www.management-aims.com/index.php?l=en

 

*Introduction To The Special Issue: The evolving debate about critical performativity*

Isabelle Huault, Véronique Perret, André Spicer, Dan Kärreman.

 

*Conditions for critical performativity in a polycontextural society*

Morten Knudsen (Copenhagen Business School)

*Abstract.* This paper argues that practice, not science, decides the performativity of science. The argument is inspired by Austin’s question of what it is that gives language its performative force. What are the conditions which connect sentences to certain effects? Advancing this question from the level of sentences to a societal level, and taking inspiration from the failure of Marxist notions of the relation between theory and practice, the paper suggests thinking critical performativity under the conditions of differentiation. This idea is qualified by means of Niklas Luhmann and his theory of a functionally differentiated – or polycontextural – society. Functional differentiation and polycontexturality mean that systems cannot communicate with each other; there is no real transfer of scientific knowledge into practice. Unhappy performativity is the rule. Based on this insight the paper discusses elements of a critical research strategy – under polycontextural conditions – and four guidelines for a critical science are suggested.

*How can performativity contribute to management and organization research? Theoretical Perspectives and analytical framework*

Franck Aggeri (MINES ParisTech)

*Abstract.* The issue of performativity reverse the classical perspective in the social sciences, for they revolve less around describing a pre-existing reality than understanding how reality is produced by intentional interventions. Yet the link between intervention and performativity is by no means automatic. On the contrary, this approach encourages us to focus on the pragmatic conditions that allow this performation to be constructed. In this sense, the aim of this article is threefold. First, it expands the field of performativity, which is structured around three dominant approaches (Austinian, Callonian and Butlerian), to encompass lesserknown research on writing and calculation. Second, it proposes a comparison between theoretical perspectives of research on performativity, and two other research trends in social science and in organizations. These, without using the term performativity, present strong similarities to it from a theoretical and methodological point of view: Foucauldian approaches and instrument-based approaches to organizations. Based on the concepts thus introduced, this article then proposes an analysis framework for performation processes in organizations, articulated around three levels of analysis: i) the study, on an elementary level, of speech acts, acts of calculation, and acts of writing organized around instrumented activities; ii) their insertion within the management dispositifs that give them meaning and contribute to defining their boundaries; and iii) the putting into perspective of these dispositifs in historical transformations in forms of governmentality. This analytical framework is applied in the case of the car project referred to as L, an instance of collaborative research in which a crisis situation characterized by the disalignment between the elementary acts studied and the management dispositif implemented by the company was examine. This case illustrates a more general phenomenon in which management dispositifs produce negative effects on the skills dynamics in a company, and on individuals’ involvement in these collective projects. It also explains the infelicity of certain performative acts.

*Art performance as research, friction and deed*

Emilie Reinhold (Stockholm Business School)

*Abstract.* To extend and enrich the debate on critical performativity, this paper proposes that critical management studies should create a strategic link with organisational aesthetics through an alliance with critical artists doing interventions in organisations. These artists produce social change at the margin of organisations and our task as critical researchers is to give a voice to their artistic action in the field of management. Art performance is presented as a research method and a political action able to give critical performativity a new impulse. Two dance performances in a bank are described and analysed: while the first one is a failure the second produces confusion and embodied tension in the bank’s lounges. The aesthetic tactics used in this art performance are counter-performative: dancers introduce slowness and hesitation of bodies in a context of extreme closure and discipline. Art performance is described as a deed: its only value is that it could be done, which calls for more artistic action in corporate everyday life.

*Critical Performativity and Embodied Performing as materio-socio-cultural Practices – Phenomenological Perspectives on performative Bodies at work*

Wendelin Küpers (ICN Business School)

*Abstract.* One of the most elementary way in which members in organisations are involved in their performances are their embodied and expressed relations and interactions. The paper shows how phenomenology can help to render explicit these incorporated experiences and dimensions of performances in organizational life-worlds. Particularly, Merleau-Ponty`s phenomenology allows to understand the interlacing role of body-related, interrelations of performing processes in and through organising. These embodied dimensions of performance will be demonstrated by examples of performative bodies at work. By concluding some perspectives on embodied performing in organisation are offered.

Heterotopian Studies (Blog)

An interesting blog devoted to the Foucauldian concept of heterotopia: Heterotopian Studies

„The site is devoted to Michel Foucault’s ideas on heterotopia. Foucault outlines the notion of heterotopia on three occasions between 1966-67. A talk given to a group of architects is the most well-known explanation of the term. Overall, Foucault attempts to describe certain relational principles and features of a range of cultural, institutional and discursive spaces that are somehow ‘different’:  disturbing, intense, incompatible, contradictory or transforming. In a nutshell, heterotopias are worlds within worlds, mirroring and yet upsetting what is outside. Foucault provides examples: ships, cemeteries, brothels, prisons, gardens of antiquity, fairs, Turkish baths and many more.

Foucault presents a few thumb-nail sketches which he never develops into a coherent idea. And yet his tantalisingly brief words on the subject have provoked a cottage industry, producing dozens of interpretations and applications from many disciplines and professions throughout the world.

[…]

The site offers thorough on-going bibliographies, background information and resources, which are updated through my blog, a selection of personal reflections and essays and some of my own specific studies of sites related to gardens and cemeteries.“

Filme und TV-Serien über Arbeit (aus einem Beitrag von Rolf Parr)

In seinem instruktiven Beitrag „>Arbeit< diskursanalytisch in den Blick nehmen. Das Promotionskolleg ‚Die Arbeit und ihre Subjekte – Mediale Diskursivierungen von Arbeit seit 1960′“ in der Zeitschrift für Diskursforschung verweist Rolf Parr (Universität Duisburg-Essen) auf eine Reihe von Filmen und Serien seit den 1970er Jahren, welche Arbeit in unterschiedlicher Weise ‚in den Blick nehmen‘. Hier die genannten Titel in alphabetischer Reihenfolge (danke an Rolf Parr für die Erlaubnis, diese Liste hier wiederzugeben):

  • „Acht Stunden sind kein Tag“ (R.W. Fassbinder, BRD 1972-1973)
  • „Arbeiter verlassen die Fabrik“ (H. Farocki, BRD 1995)
  • „Brassed off“ (M. Herman, GB/USA 1996)
  • „Freigestellt. Die Zukunft der Arbeit in Zeiten des Überflusses.“ (C. Stigel, BRD 2012)
  • „Frohes Schaffen. Ein Film zur Senkung der Arbeitsmoral“ (K. Faigle, BRD 2012)
  • „Hände weg vom Interessenausgleich“ (Arbeit und Film (AUF), BRD 1978)
  • „Hat er Arbeit?“ (K. Wessels, BRD 2001)
  • „Jede Menge Kohle“ (A. Winckelmann, BRD 1981)
  • „Lichter“ (H.C. Schmid, BRD 2003)
  • „Mit Schlips und Kragen“ (Arbeit und Film (AUF), BRD 1981)
  • „Out of Darkness: The Mine Worker’s Story“ (B. Kopple/B. Davies, USA 1990)
  • „Prinzessinnenbad“ (B. Blümner, BRD 2007)
  • „Riff-Raff“ (K. Loach, GB 1991)
  • „Roger & Me“ (M. Moore, USA 1989)
  • „Rosetta“ (J.-P. und L Dardenne, BE/F 1998)
  • „The Wire“ (USA 2002-2008)
  • „Union Maids“ (J. Klein/J. Reichert/M. Mogulescu, USA 1976)
  • „Wohin? Angestellte und Arbeiter im Kampf um die Sicherung ihrer Arbeitsplätze“ (Arbeit und Film (AUF), BRD 1979)
  • „Work hard, Play hard“ (C. Losmann, BRD 2012)
  • „Yella“ (C. Petzold, BRD 2007)
  • „Working Stiffs“ (Fernsehserie, USA 1979)

 

 

Die Genossenschaft – Bürgerschaftliches Engagement soll leichter werden. Feature im Deutschlandfunk

Ein instruktives Feature über Genossenschaften als mögliche Form (nicht nur) bürgerschaftlichen Engagements und über geplante Veränderungen im Sinne von Vereinfachungen der Genossenschaftsprüfung. Angesichts der nicht zuletzt durch die Prüfung bedingten niedrigen Insolvenzrate von Genossenschaften ein nicht unproblematisches Unterfangen …

Hier geht es zur Sendung und zum Podcast:

http://www.deutschlandfunk.de/die-genossenschaft-buergerschaftliches-engagement-soll.724.de.html?dram:article_id=386114

CfP Tagung „Von der Künstlerkritik zur Kritik an der Kreativität“

Im Rahmen des Promotionskollegs „Die Arbeit und ihre Subjekte. Mediale Diskursivierungen seit 1960“ an der Universität Duisburg-Essen findet vom 12.-14.10 die Tagung „Von der Künstlerkritik zur Kritik an der Kreativität“ statt. Aus der Ankündigung:

„Die interdisziplinäre Konferenz möchte Subjektivierungsprozesse im Bereich kreativer Arbeit als einen Ausgangspunkt nehmen, um aktuelle Forschungsfragen und Positionen zur Debatte um Projekthaftigkeit und Kreativität als scheinbare Paradigmen aller Arbeits- und Lebensformen im ‚neuen Kapitalismus‘ zu diskutieren. Dabei sollen neben kritischen wissenschaftlichen Positionen verschiedener Disziplinen (von Literatur- und Medienwissenschaften bis zu empirischer Sozialforschung) auch Ansätze praxisorientierter Kritik an Subjektivierungweisen und dem Kreativitätsdispositiv in den Blick genommen werden.“

Weitere Informationen und der vollständige Call finden sich hier:

https://www.uni-due.de/promotionskolleg_arbeit/konferenz_kreativitaet

 

Community Economies – Webseite zu alternativen Formen des Wirtschaftens

Die Seite „Community Economies“ bietet zahlreiche Informationen und Ressourcen (Artikel, Videos, Unterrichtsmaterialien, praktische Handreichungen, weitere Links) zu alternativen Formen des Wirtschaftens. Entstanden ist die Seite vor dem Hintergrund der Arbeiten von Gibson-Graham (vgl. Gibson-Graham 2006a, 2006b, 2008) und der Perspektive der ‚diverse economies‘:

http://www.communityeconomies.org/Home

 

Quellen:

Gibson-Graham, J. K. (2006a): The end of capitalism (as we knew it). A feminist critique of political economy. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Gibson-Graham, J. K. (2006b): A postcapitalist politics. Minneapolis, London: University of Minnesota Press.

Gibson-Graham, J. K. (2008): Diverse economies: performative practices for `other worlds‘. In: Progress in Human Geography 32 (5), S. 613–632.

 

 

„Kein Gott, kein Herr! – Eine kleine Geschichte der Anarchie“ – Dokumentarfilm Arte

Bereits gestern lief der zweiteilige Dokumentarfilm zur Geschichte der anarchistischen Bewegung auf Arte. Über Proudhon und Kropotkin entfaltet sich diese instruktive Geschichte der Anarchie in ihrer Beziehung zur Arbeiterschaft, zur Entwicklung der Gewerkschaften und Kooperativen, zur Idee des Streiks, zu den aufkommenden Massenmedien bis hin zum Kampf im spanischen Bürgerkrieg und den vielfältigen und brutalen Repressionen, welchen der Anarchismus aber auch die Arbeiterschaft über die geschilderten Jahrzehnte ausgesetzt waren. Beide Teile sind noch für wenige Tage in der Mediathek nachzusehen:

http://www.arte.tv/guide/de/047435-001-A/kein-gott-kein-herr-eine-kleine-geschichte-der-anarchie-1-2

 

 

Democratic Renewal in Civil Society Organizations – ‘Democracy at Work: Organizing democratically’, Wednesday 29th March, Nottingham Trent University

Democratic Renewal in Civil Society Organizations

ESRC Seminar Four – Nottingham Trent University

‘Democracy at Work: Organizing democratically’

Wednesday 29th March, 2017, 10:30-5, Newton Building, Nottingham Trent University.

The event is free – please book here

Civil society organisations are often considered a good thing in and of themselves, contributing to making a more healthy and democratic society. Yet whilst attention is often focused on their external role, how they contribute to changing society, less attention is placed on their internal ways of organising. Indeed many civil society organisations are shaped by increase forms of business-like practices as they have to become more professional and managerial which can often result in them replicated many of the hierarchical practices that can leave them, at times, indistinguishable from their for-profit counter-parts.

This seminar will explore the possibilities of internal processes and practices through which civil society organisations arrange themselves in order to become more democratic. In particular it will look at different models and processes, which draw inspiration from anarchism and the alter-globalization movement through to political theory to examine not only why civil society organizations should consider working more democratically but also how to go about it.

 

Our confirmed speakers are:

Janet Dalziell, International People and Culture Director at Greenpeace International

Greenpeace International are one of the most innovative Civil Society Organizations combining activism with its public campaigning role. Over the last few years they have been through a fascinating restructuring programme designed to give more autonomy to local national and regional offices to be more responsive to their particular circumstances. Janet is a key architect of a major re-design of Greenpeace’s global operating model, focusing on the development of human capacity within the organization and aimed at making Greenpeace more effective in achieving just and sustainable global change to protect the environment.

Professor Ruth Kinna, and Dr Thomas Swann Loughborough University, will be discussing anarchism as a constitutional principle

Dr Ruth Yeoman, Research Fellow at the Saïd Business School and Kellogg College, University of Oxford, is an expert on mutuality and meaningfulness of work. Her book Meaningful Work and Workplace Democracy: a philosophy of work and a politics of meaningfulness, is published by Palgrave Macmillan

Dr Matt Wilson, Activist and anarchist and the author of Rules without rulers: The possibilities and limits of anarchism

 

Schedule

10.30 Arrival and coffee

11.00 Welcome, and context for the seminar – Daniel King, NTU

11.15 – Janet Dalziell

12.00 – Response and Q&A

12.30 – Lunch

13.30 – 15.00 – Main Panel:

13.30 – Ruth Kinna and Thomas Swann

14.00 – Ruth Yeoman

14:25 – Matt Wilson,

14.45 – Tea break

15.30 – Breakout group discussions – ‘How can Civil Society organizations work in more democratic forms?’

16.00 – Report back from groups

16.30 – Summaries and close

 

The Venue and Organisers

Newton Building, Nottingham Trent University, NG1 4FQ http://www4.ntu.ac.uk/about_ntu/document_uploads/189251.pdf

The seminar is organised by Daniel King from Nottingham Trent University. Please email daniel.king@ntu.ac.uk if you have any questions

„Das ist unser Haus“ – Dokumentarfilm über das Mietshäuser Syndikat

Hier einige Informationen zum Film (Quelle: https://vimeo.com/193034732):

Räume aneignen mit dem Mietshäuser Syndikat.
Der Film „Das ist unser Haus!“ erläutert das solidarische Modell des Mietshäuser Syndikats (syndikat.org), mit dem sich auch finanzschwache Gruppen bezahlbare Räume in Gemeineigentum nachhaltig sichern können.
„Das ist unser Haus!“ ist ein Film der Autoren und Produzenten Burkhard Grießenauer, Daniel Kunle und Holger Lauinger. Die Produktion wurde mit Hilfe des SEELAND Medienkooperative e.V. realisiert.

Gemeineigentum – Selbstorganisation – Solidarität – Seit vielen Jahren gibt es eine Netzwerkstruktur von mehr als 100 Hausprojekten in Stadt und Land, um die Wohnungsfrage nach anderen Werten zu organisieren: das Mietshäuser Syndikat. Finanzschwache Gruppen können sich mit der Solidarität anderer ermächtigen und so bezahlbare Räume sichern. Deshalb wächst in immer mehr Köpfen das Interesse an dieser wichtigen Initiative aus der Zivilgesellschaft.

Im 65 minütigen Film „Das ist unser Haus!“ erläutern Akteure des Mietshäuser Syndikats das Modell der kollektiven Raumaneignung und präsentieren vielseitige Projekte in unterschiedlichen räumlichen Kontexten. Die Zuschauer werden motiviert, eigene Projekte im stabilen solidarischen Verbund des Mietshäuser Syndikats zu starten.

Mit Impressionen aus den Projekten: Freie Hütte (Lübeck), LÜDIA (Hadmersleben), Handwerkerhof Ottensen (Hamburg), Jugendwohnprojekt Mittendrin (Neuruppin), Grether Gelände (Freiburg), 4-Häuser-Projekt (Tübingen)

 

„Das ist unser Haus!“ from SEELAND Medienkooperative on Vimeo.