Schlagwort-Archive: Organisation

Call for Papers: Freedom, work and organizations in the 21st century – Freedom for whom and for whose purpose?

Another interesting call for papers for a special issue of the journal Human Relations:

Freedom, work and organizations in the 21st century – Freedom for whom and for whose purpose?

Guest Editors: Lynne Andersson, Dirk Lindebaum, James Chamberlain, Michelle Greenwood, Frank den Hond

The deadline for submissions is 1 June 2020 with submissions submitted no earlier than 01 May 2020.

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of Organization: Decolonising Management and Organisational Knowledge

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of Organization
Decolonising Management and Organisational Knowledge

Deadline: 30th November 2019

Guest Editors
Nimruji Jammulamadaka (IIM Calcutta, India),
Alex Faria (FGV, Brazil),
Gavin Jack (Monash University, Australia),
Shaun Ruggunan (University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa)

Excerpt:

„This special issue focuses on decolonising management and organisational knowledge (MOK), a vital and  timely  endeavour. The contemporary  globalised  world  is  experiencing  new  and  continuing conditions of coloniality/decoloniality (Mignolo & Walsh, 2018) organised by forces of transnational capital and the nation-state on the one side, but counter-balanced by resurging, insurging peoples and scholars on the other. The nature and momentum of these axes of neo-colonial power and decolonial praxis-theory (Mignolo & Walsh, 2018) has led Mbembe (2016: 36) to observe that the “decolonizing project is back  on  the  agenda  worldwide”. Decolonial conversations set out to both critique the
“dominant Eurocentric academic model” and “imagine what an alternative to this model could look like” (Mbembe, 2016: 36).  „

CfP: https://journals.sagepub.com/page/org/call-for-papers

ILPC 2019, 24-26 April 2019 Vienna – Fragmentation and Solidarities

Labor Process Theory is one of the most prominent critical approaches in Management and Organization Studies. The 37th International Labour Process Conference will be held in Vienna from 24-26 April. You can find the full programme here:

https://www.ilpc.org.uk/

New Publication: Partizipationspraktiken in Genossenschaften. HBS Study 418

Partizipationspraktiken_HBS_Study_Titel

 

Im Zuge der Diskussion um alternative Wirtschaftsformen sind auch Genossenschaften wieder in den Fokus der Öffentlichkeit gerückt. Wie aber setzen Genossenschaften das Ideal demokratischer Partizipation in der Praxis um? Und wie verhält sich die Beteiligung der Mitglieder zur Mitbestimmung der Arbeitnehmerinnen und Arbeitnehmer? Anhand von vierzehn Fallstudien zeichnet diese Studie ein differenziertes Bild der Partizipationspraxis in Genossenschaften. Auch wenn so manche Genossenschaft vom demokratischen Ideal weit entfernt ist, zeigt die Studie, unter welchen Voraussetzungen ihr demokratisches Potenzial genutzt werden kann.

 

Der zusammen mit Melanie Hühn, Irma Rybnikova und Markus Tümpel verfasste Bericht zu unserem von der Hans-Böckler-Stiftung finanzierten Projekt über Partizipation in Genossenschaften ist nun als Band der HBS Study Reihe erschienen. Der Band steht kostenfrei zum Download zur Verfügung.

Hier der Link zu unserer Studie: https://www.boeckler.de/5248.htm?produkt=HBS-007122&chunk=1&jahr=#

Hier der Band als PDF zum Download: Hartz et al – Partizipationspraktiken in Genossenschaften_HBS Study 418

 

 

New Publication: Postmoderne und Poststrukturalismus in der Organisationsforschung

Mein Beitrag für das Handbuch Organisationssoziologie (hrsg. von Maja Apelt, Ingo Bode, Raimund Hasse, Uli Meyer, Victoria V. Groddeck, Maximiliane Wilkesmann und Arnold Windeler) zu Postmoderne und Poststrukturalismus in der Organisationsforschung ist nun Online:

https://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007/978-3-658-15953-5_12-1

Abstract

Der Beitrag diskutiert den Einfluss von Postmoderne und Poststrukturalismus auf
die Organisationsforschung. Beide Denkrichtungen sind als ein Plädoyer für
Differenz zu verstehen und zugleich durch eine Skepsis gegenüber den modernen
Erzählungen des Fortschritts, der Rationalität und der Wahrheit geprägt. Der
Beitrag geht zunächst auf die Entstehungsgeschichte ein und diskutiert anschlie-
ßend mit Sprache und Diskurs, Macht, Subjektivierung und Prozesshaftigkeit von
Organisationen zentrale Themen der Debatte in der Organisationsforschung. Mit
Exkursen zu Lyotard, Baudrillard, Derrida und Foucault werden vier wichtige
Autoren der Debatte näher vorgestellt. Abschließend werden zentrale Kritik-
punkte an einer an Postmoderne und Poststrukturalismus anknüpfenden Organi-
sationsforschung benannt.

Keywords

Postmoderne · Poststrukturalismus · Foucault · Derrida · Lyotard · Baudrillard

„Post-Growth Organizations“ – Special Issue in Management Revue – Part 2

MREV_Cover_4_2018The final three articles of our Special Issue on „Post-Growth Organizations“ are published now. Many thanks to all the contributors and the reviewers!

For more information follow the link:

https://www.nomos-elibrary.de/10.5771/0935-9915-2018-4/mrev-management-revue-jahrgang-29-2018-heft-4

The first part of the Special Issue (including the Editorial) can be found here:

https://www.nomos-elibrary.de/10.5771/0935-9915-2018-3/mrev-management-revue-jahrgang-29-2018-heft-3

CfP – CMS 2019 Sub-theme 2: Between subjugation and emancipation: Recognizing the power of recognition

We are pleased to announce that our Call for Papers for the CMS Conference 2019 is now online. Deadline for Abstracts is the 31st January 2019:

http://business-school.open.ac.uk/events/11th-international-critical-management-studies-conference

The 11th International Critical Management Conference 27th – 29th June 2019, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, UK

SUB-THEME 2: Between subjugation and emancipation: Recognizing the power of recognition

Convenors:

Gabriele Fassauer (Dresden University of Technology, Germany)

Ronald Hartz (University of Leicester, UK)

Gazi Islam (Grenoble Ecole de Management, France)

 

Recognition is an important factor shaping individual and collective well-being, dignity and flourishing, both within organizations and in society more generally (Honneth 1996; Fraser and Honneth 2003; Sayer 2007a, 2007b). For many researchers on management and organizations, recognition is an implicit “affirmation of the social-affective bond between members” (Islam, 2012: 38). Recognition is constitutive for people’s identity-building, their sense of dignity and corresponding self-respect (Grover, 2013; Hancock, 2016; Holtgrewe, 2001; Islam, 2013; Sayer, 2007a). Considered as fundamentally interdependent, people are viewed as “needy beings” that are capable of suffering and flourishing depending on other´s recognition (Sayer, 2007b: 23). Recognition is understood as the intersubjective acknowledgement of value of a person´s behaviours, actions and identities, which supports “a feeling that one is living a worthwhile life and a confidence in one’s ability to do what one considers worthwhile” (Sayer, 2005: 954). Recognition is thus inevitably aligned with a moral dimension of society, economy and organizations as it refers to basic notions of how people should treat each other (Honneth 1996; Sayer, 2005). One of the most elaborated ways to anchor the idea of recognition in social theory was provided by Axel Honneth (1996), an intellectual successor of the Frankfurt School and critical theory. For Honneth, the struggle for recognition, as both a cognitive source for subjectivity and an affective basis of self-esteem, is part of the human condition and one of the drivers of social progress and betterment (Honneth 1996; Fraser and Honneth 2003).

However, recognition is also discussed in the French tradition of structuralism and poststructuralism, which conceptualizes recognition as basis of the development of self-consciousness and identity-building inescapable linked to forms of subjugation and power (e.g. Althusser, 2014 [1970]; Foucault, 1982; Butler, 1997). From this perspective, people’s desire for recognition is intermingled with power and control mechanisms that serve the perpetuation of societal as well as organizational power structures and domination. Organizations are one of the important economic and social formations “[w]here social categories guarantee a recognizable and enduring social existence” (Butler 1997: 20). But, as Butler continues, “the embrace of such categories, even as they work in the service of subjection, is often preferred to no social existence at all” (ibid.). Giving voice to the complexities arising from these two traditions of thinking about recognition, our stream aims to develop a more fully-fledged notion of recognition at the workplace. We welcome conceptual and empirical papers that deal with questions of recognition at the societal, organizational or individual workplace level and which pay tribute both to the emancipatory and subjugating character of recognition. Related topics can be various and could address, but are not restricted to the following questions:

  • What are the potentials of different contexts of work and forms of organizing in terms of people´s emancipation and subjugation through recognition? What roles, for example, do people´s age, gender, sexual orientation or cultural background play in recognition dynamics?
  • How is recognition played out at the workplace? What are the desires, practises, and conflicts of recognition? Which consequences can be observed for people´s well-being and suffering?
  • How do issues of recognition relate to current debates around identity-based politics in organizations and society? How can a recognition lens help develop a critical theory to understand diverse forms of domination and resistance?
  • What are the complementarities and/or contradictions between struggles for recognition and struggles for redistribution? How can recognition theorizing help understand tensions between economic and symbolic forms of politics at work?
  • Which differences exist between alternative organizations and conventional forms of organized work in terms of recognition?
  • How do new technologies and emerging forms of organizing work change established orders of recognition?
  • What are the historical paths of struggles for recognition in organizations? How are they related to societal shifts and developments?
  • What are the potentials as well as limits of consolidating different theoretical angles of recognition, especially regarding the ‘camps’ of critical theory and poststructuralism?

Submission of abstracts:

Please send abstracts or any questions to Gabriele Fassauer (gabriele.fassauer@tu-dresden.de).

Abstracts should be a maximum 1000 words, A4 paper, single spaced, 12-point font.  Deadline 31st January 2019.

Notification of paper acceptance: 1st March 2019.

Full papers will be expected by 1st June 2019.

 

Your abstract should include:

– Title

– The focus and objectives of the paper

– How the paper will contribute to the theme

 

References

Althusser, L. 2014. On the reproduction of capitalism. Ideology and ideological state

apparatuses. London, New York: Verso.

Butler, J. 1997. The psychic life of power. Theories in subjection. Stanford: Stanford Univ. Press.

Foucault, M. 1982. The subject and power. Critical Inquiry 8 (4), 777-795.

Fraser, N., & Honneth, A. 2003. Redistribution or recognition? Verso, London, NY.

Grover St. L. 2013. Unraveling respect in organization studies. Human Relations 67 (1), 27-51.

Hancock, P. 2016. Recognition and the moral taint of sexuality. Threat, masculinity and Santa Claus. Human Relations 69 (2), 461-481.

Holtgrewe, U. 2001. Recognition, intersubjectivity and service work: Labour conflicts in call centres. Industrielle Beziehungen 8 (1), 37-55.

Honneth, A. 1996. The struggle for recognition. Polity Press, Cambridge (MA).

Islam, G. (2012) Recognition, reification and practices of forgetting: Ethical implications of

human resource management. Journal of Business Ethics, 111 (1), 37-48.

Sayer, A. 2005. Class, moral worth and recognition. Sociology 39 (5), 947-963.

Sayer, A. 2007a. Dignity at work: Broadening the agenda. Organization 14 (4), 565-581.

Sayer, A. 2007b. Moral economy and employment. In S. C. Bolton and M. Houlihan (eds.), Searching for the human in human resource management, (pp. 21-40). Palgrave, London.

New Publication on Cooperatives – Pansera/Rizzi (2018): Furbish or perish: Italian social cooperatives at a crossroads. In: Organization (OnlineFirst)

Another interesting case study about about market pressure, scaling up of coops and the conflict between democratic management and commercial success.

Pansera, Mario/Rizzi, Francesco (2018): Furbish or perish: Italian social cooperatives at a crossroads. In: Organization (OnlineFirst).

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1350508418760980

Abstract

Although the public debate tends to privilege investor-owned organisations, alternative forms of organisation are mushrooming at the borders of the capitalist economy. In this work, we contribute to the debate on alternative economies by analysing a specific form of worker-owned organisations which originated in Italy in the 1970s and was recognised by Italian legislation in the 1990s: the social cooperative. By drawing on data gathered over 3 years of participant observation, this article explores the tensions and contradictions generated by the rapid growth of an Italian social cooperative focused on waste recovery and its preparation for reuse. We show how social cooperatives might be able to reconcile their commercial success with their founding principles of equality and democratic management. This article contributes to the debate on the ‘regeneration thesis’ by providing new insights into the factors and drivers that force social cooperatives to scale up and to engage in competition with mainstream competitors, the internal conflicts and solutions that emerge in this process and the external alliances that social cooperatives can leverage to prosper and flourish.

New Article about Cooperatives – Audebrand (2017): Expanding the scope of paradox scholarship on social enterprise: the case for (re)introducing worker cooperatives. In: M@n@gement 2017/4.

Between ‘staying  alternative’  and  ‘going  mainstream’ …

Audebrand, L. (2017). Expanding the scope of paradox scholarship on social enterprise: the case for (re)introducing worker cooperatives. M@n@gement, vol. 20,(4), 368-393. doi:10.3917/mana.204.0368.

https://www.cairn.info/revue-management-2017-4-page-368.html

Abstract. Over the past decade, scholars have argued for using a paradox
perspective  as  a  provocative  and  insightful  lens  for  understanding  social
enterprises. This article addresses two gaps in this burgeoning literature.
First,  it  expands  the  focus  on  social  enterprises  to  include  worker
cooperatives,  which  are  often  overlooked  but  are  highly  relevant  to  this
area  of  study.  Worker  cooperatives  are  unique  among  social  enterprises
due to their foundational principles: worker-ownership, worker-control and
worker-benefit. Due to their dual nature as both a democratic association
and  an  economic  enterprise,  the  relationship  between  the  cooperative’s
social  mission  and  its  business  venture  is  mutually  constitutive  and
inescapable.  Second,  this  article  calls  for  paradox  scholarship  on  social
enterprise  to  include  the  study  of  paradoxical  tensions  other  than  the
conspicuous tension between financial and social performance. This article
suggests  broadening  this  focus  to  include  the  tensions  between
communality  and  individuality,  hierarchy  and  democracy,  and  between
‘staying  alternative’  and  ‘going  mainstream’.  Overall,  this  article  seeks  to
construct  a  stronger  theoretical  basis  on  which  to  build  future  paradox
research on alternatives to the dominant economic paradigm.

New Publication: Pynnönen/Takala – The Discursive Dance: The Employee Co-operation Negotiations as an Arena for Management-by-fear

An interesting study about downsizing, it’s discursive construction through companies and media and the enforcement of a ‚management-by-fear‘:

Pynnönen, Anu; Takala, Tuomo (2018): The Discursive Dance: The Employee Co-operation Negotiations as an Arena for Management-by-fear. In: Journal of Business Ethics 147 (1), S. 165–184.

DOI: 10.1007/s10551-015-2991-8

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10551-015-2991-8?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to qualitatively describe and critically explain the discursive construction of employee co-operation negotiations in Finland as an arena for management-by-fear. The article consists of a theoretical review, covering the legislative basis of co-
operation negotiations and recent research on management-by-fear. The empirical study consists of media texts and company media releases in Finland in 2012–2013. The
main conclusions are that there are distinctive features in the co-operation negotiations that enable and enforce the possibility of management-by-fear, and thus destructive
leadership. The process, supported by law and very much against the original aim, enhances authoritative leadership, objectification of employees, distortion of information and
misleading, and the negative consequences thereof. The process is an employer-invited discursive dance where the employee has to follow through the set steps and in the set
rhythm, with the media orchestrating the tune and managing the fear. The study adds a valuable element to the research areas of downsizing, bad management, and the
discursive construction of these phenomena.