Schlagwort-Archiv: Democracy

Gemeinnützige Genossenschaft als Rechtsform für Alternativbetriebe

Die Frage möglicher Rechtsformen und den damit verknüpften partizipativen und basisdemokratischen Elementen ist bedeutsam für alternative Organisationsformen. Die gemeinnützige Genossenschaft stellt eine Möglichkeit dar – hierzu ein knapper Bericht über den zu den Höfen der solidarischen Landwirtschaft (SoLAWi) zählenden Vauß-Hof in der Zeitschrift contraste:

http://www.contraste.org/index.php?id=269

Symposium „Partizipationspraktiken in Genossenschaften“ – Manuskripte und Folien

Zu unserem Symposium „Partizipationspraktiken in Genossenschaften“ im April in Chemnitz stehen nun die Manuskripte und Foliensätze als Download zur Verfügung. Herzlichen Dank an alle Beitragenden für das zur Verfügung stellen der Manuskripte! Hier die einzelnen Beiträge:

Jürgen Keßler, HTW Berlin: Genossenschaften zwischen unternehmerischer
Effizienz und Teilhabe – eine ökonomische und rechtliche Analyse

Herbert Klemisch, Wissenschaftsladen Bonn: (Post)Demokratie und Unternehmensmitbestimmung in Genossenschaften

Walter Vogt, IG Metall: ‚Mehr Teilhabe wagen‘: Belegschaftsgenossenschaften
als Möglichkeit für die Förderung betrieblicher Partizipation im Kontext von Standort- und
Beschäftigungssicherung

Ronald Hartz, Melanie Hühn, Irma Rybnikova, Markus Tümpel: Partizipationspraktiken in Genossenschaften – Ergebnisse und Diskussion der Fallstudien
Hier der Link zu den Materialien:

https://www.tu-chemnitz.de/wirtschaft/ppig/projekt/aktivitaeten/

 

 

 

 

CfP – DISSENSUS! RADICAL DEMOCRACY AND BUSINESS ETHICS. Special Issue of the Journal of Business Ethics

Call for Papers

Special Issue of the Journal of Business Ethics

DISSENSUS! RADICAL DEMOCRACY AND BUSINESS ETHICS

Submission Deadline: 4 June 2018

GUEST EDITORS:

Carl Rhodes, University of Technology Sydney, Australia. carl.rhodes@uts.edu.au

Iain Munro, Newcastle University, UK. iain.munro@ncl.ac.uk

Torkild Thanem, Stockholm University, Sweden. tt@sbs.su.se

Alison Pullen, Macquarie University, Australia. alison.pullen@mq.edu.au

INTRODUCTION TO THE SPECIAL ISSUE

In an era of prolonged financial crisis, political instability and worldwide injustice, the economic and ethical legitimacy of corporate power requires continued challenge. Scandal after scandal has revealed corporations showing little regard for the institutions of liberal democracy. Whether it be tax evasion, law breaking, political lobbying or outright corruption, corporations are content to flout notions of justice, equality and freedom in an escalating pursuit of profit (see Barkan 2013; Brown 2015). Liberal democracy promises opportunity and inclusion, yet democratic states are complicit in strengthening the power of the corporations they glorify as wealth creators and job securers. In ‘post-democracy’ (Crouch, 2004) politics revolves around the conflated interests of corporations and politicians, reinforcing injustice and inequality on a global scale and resulting in poverty, torture, trafficking, imprisonment, and death. This special issue will investigate and challenge this state of affairs by exploring business ethics as it relates to ‘radical democracy’ (Mouffe, 1996; Robbins, 2011). This is democracy conceived as an ethical alternative to the potent marriage of the liberal democratic state and corporate power. As Rancière (2015) explains, the political dissensus required for democracy bears witness to marginalized voices excluded from the prevailing status quo. Such dissensus also enacts a particular ethics rested in the radical questioning and subversion of the totalizing tendencies of power. In response to what Ziarek (2001) has called ‘the ethics of dissensus’, the political task is to fight against the powers, injustices and inequalities that affect people not just politically, but also materially. This ethics goes beyond the questioning of corporate power, and projects us towards trajectories where people already live and work independently of the corporate-government complex. The ethics and politics of dissensus becomes the radically democratic alternative, directed towards sustainable futures at the level of life itself.

POSSIBLE THEMES AND TOPICS

Papers are called for which explore the ethics and politics of radical democracy as it manifests in dissensus and the subversion of corporate power by alternative democratic practices and realities. This is no fantasy, it is witnessed by struggles in domains as diverse as environmentalism, agriculture, affective labour, domestic work, craftwork, art, and the hacker ethic of the open source community. Acknowledging that contemporary politics have created an inverse relationship between corporate power and democracy, we seek to consider the character of this inversion, how it has been resisted, and the alternatives to it. We do not just ask whether democratic alternatives to the liberalistic reign of corporations, markets and corporate governments are possible, but how they are and can be realized. Required is a profound ethico-political engagement; a struggle that moves from critique, to resistance, to alternative realities. This evokes, in Spivak’s (1993) words, an ‘impossible intimacy of the ethical’ that strives for a genuine respect of the value of difference. Such intimacy can also invoke a politically aware and democratic business ethics built on the potential of dissent, alterity and critique as a means of refusing hegemony of all types. Papers might consider, but are by no means limited to, the following topics:

• The effects of Free Trade Agreements and trade wars on democracy.

• Spaces, places and strategies for ethicso-political democratic dissent.

• The politics, ethics and aesthetics of dissensus, through feminism and critical race theory.

• The ethico-political struggle for alternative ways of life, work and organization in the context of global and nationalist capitalism.

• Alternative economies and the subversion of free market liberalism.

• The development of a heterodox management studies to better imagine alternatives within the field of management studies.

• The ‘depoliticization’ of theory and academic work more generally

• The praxis, organization and effectiveness of anti-corporate movements.

• Business ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility as anti-democratic forms of corporate consensus.

• Inequality, difference and class struggle.

• Critiques of corporate sovereignty, justice and dissent.

• Tensions between the materiality of democracy, neoliberal rationality and neoconservative ideology.

SUBMISSION PROCESS AND DEADLINE

Authors should refer to the Journal of Business Ethics website for instructions on submitting a paper and for more information about the journal: http://www.springer.com/social+sciences/applied+ethics/journal/10551. Submission to the special issue by 4 June 2018 is required through Editorial Manager at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/busi/. Upon submission, please indicate that your sub- mission is to this Special Issue. Questions about potential topics and papers should be directed to the guest editors.

REFERENCES

Barkan, J. (2013) Corporate Sovereignty: Law and Government Under Capitalism, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Brown, W. (2015) Undoing the Demos: Neoliberalism’s Stealth Revolution, New York: Zone Books.

Crouch, C. (2004) Post-Democracy, Cambridge: Polity.

Mouffe, C. (1996) Dimensions of Radical Democracy: Pluralism, Citizenship, Community. London: Verso.

Rancière, J. (2015) Dissensus: On Politics and Aesthetics, London: Continuum

Robbins, J. W. (2011) Radical Democracy and Political Theology, New York: Columbia.

Spivak , G. (1993) Outside the Teaching Machine, London: Routeldge.

Ziarek, E. P. (2001) Postmodernity, Feminism and the Politics of Radical Democracy. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Die Rückkehr des Dorfladens als Genossenschaft – 2

Vor einiger Zeit habe ich, auf einen Hausbesuch der taz verweisend, über die Rückkehr des Dorfladens als Genossenschaft am Beispiel des Ortes Bernitt in Mecklenburg berichtet. Im DLF-Magazin des Deutschlandfunk wurde gestern unter der Überschrift „Dorfladen statt Discounter“ über einen anderen, bisher erfolgreich laufenden Fall einer solchen Neugründung in Jagsthausen (Landkreis Heilbronn) berichtet . Hier geht es zur Reportage:

http://www.deutschlandfunk.de/dorfladen-statt-discounter-wiederbelebung-eines-sozialen.862.de.html?dram:article_id=386545

 

 

Die Genossenschaft – Bürgerschaftliches Engagement soll leichter werden. Feature im Deutschlandfunk

Ein instruktives Feature über Genossenschaften als mögliche Form (nicht nur) bürgerschaftlichen Engagements und über geplante Veränderungen im Sinne von Vereinfachungen der Genossenschaftsprüfung. Angesichts der nicht zuletzt durch die Prüfung bedingten niedrigen Insolvenzrate von Genossenschaften ein nicht unproblematisches Unterfangen …

Hier geht es zur Sendung und zum Podcast:

http://www.deutschlandfunk.de/die-genossenschaft-buergerschaftliches-engagement-soll.724.de.html?dram:article_id=386114

Community Economies – Webseite zu alternativen Formen des Wirtschaftens

Die Seite „Community Economies“ bietet zahlreiche Informationen und Ressourcen (Artikel, Videos, Unterrichtsmaterialien, praktische Handreichungen, weitere Links) zu alternativen Formen des Wirtschaftens. Entstanden ist die Seite vor dem Hintergrund der Arbeiten von Gibson-Graham (vgl. Gibson-Graham 2006a, 2006b, 2008) und der Perspektive der ‚diverse economies‘:

http://www.communityeconomies.org/Home

 

Quellen:

Gibson-Graham, J. K. (2006a): The end of capitalism (as we knew it). A feminist critique of political economy. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Gibson-Graham, J. K. (2006b): A postcapitalist politics. Minneapolis, London: University of Minnesota Press.

Gibson-Graham, J. K. (2008): Diverse economies: performative practices for `other worlds‘. In: Progress in Human Geography 32 (5), S. 613–632.

 

 

Reminder: Symposium „Partizipation in Genossenschaften“, 28.04.2017, TU Chemnitz

Was bedeuten Demokratie, Partizipation und Mitbestimmung in Genossenschaften heute? Wie wird Partizipation von Mitgliedern und Mitarbeitern gelebt und gestaltet?

Am 28.04.2017 findet anlässlich unseres von der Hans-Böckler-Stiftung finanzierten Forschungsprojektes „Partizipationspraktiken in Genossenschaften“ (https://www.tu-chemnitz.de/wirtschaft/ppig/index.php) ein Symposium zum Thema „Partizipation in Genossenschaften“ mit Vorträgen und einer Podiumsdiskussion statt.

Themen und Vortragende:

  • Genossenschaften zwischen unternehmerischer Effizienz und Teilhabe – eine ökonomische und rechtliche Analyse (Jürgen Keßler, HTW Berlin)
  • (Post)Demokratie und Unternehmensmitbestimmung in Genossenschaften (Herbert Klemisch, Wissenschaftsladen Bonn)
  • ‚Mehr Teilhabe wagen‘: Belegschaftsgenossenschaften als Möglichkeit für die Förderung betrieblicher Partizipation im Kontext von Standort- und Beschäftigungssicherung (Walter Vogt, IG Metall)
  • Partizipationspraktiken in Genossenschaften – Ergebnisse und Diskussion der Fallstudien
    (Ronald Hartz, Melanie Hühn, Irma Rybnikova, Markus Tümpel, TU Chemnitz)
  • Podiumsdiskussion: „Partizipation in Genossenschaften“, Moderation: Rainhart Lang
    Gäste: Walter Vogt (IG Metall), Jürgen Keßler (HTW Berlin), Barbara Rische (VG eG), Dietmar Berger (Verbandspräsident i.R.)

Democratic Renewal in Civil Society Organizations – ‘Democracy at Work: Organizing democratically’, Wednesday 29th March, Nottingham Trent University

Democratic Renewal in Civil Society Organizations

ESRC Seminar Four – Nottingham Trent University

‘Democracy at Work: Organizing democratically’

Wednesday 29th March, 2017, 10:30-5, Newton Building, Nottingham Trent University.

The event is free – please book here

Civil society organisations are often considered a good thing in and of themselves, contributing to making a more healthy and democratic society. Yet whilst attention is often focused on their external role, how they contribute to changing society, less attention is placed on their internal ways of organising. Indeed many civil society organisations are shaped by increase forms of business-like practices as they have to become more professional and managerial which can often result in them replicated many of the hierarchical practices that can leave them, at times, indistinguishable from their for-profit counter-parts.

This seminar will explore the possibilities of internal processes and practices through which civil society organisations arrange themselves in order to become more democratic. In particular it will look at different models and processes, which draw inspiration from anarchism and the alter-globalization movement through to political theory to examine not only why civil society organizations should consider working more democratically but also how to go about it.

 

Our confirmed speakers are:

Janet Dalziell, International People and Culture Director at Greenpeace International

Greenpeace International are one of the most innovative Civil Society Organizations combining activism with its public campaigning role. Over the last few years they have been through a fascinating restructuring programme designed to give more autonomy to local national and regional offices to be more responsive to their particular circumstances. Janet is a key architect of a major re-design of Greenpeace’s global operating model, focusing on the development of human capacity within the organization and aimed at making Greenpeace more effective in achieving just and sustainable global change to protect the environment.

Professor Ruth Kinna, and Dr Thomas Swann Loughborough University, will be discussing anarchism as a constitutional principle

Dr Ruth Yeoman, Research Fellow at the Saïd Business School and Kellogg College, University of Oxford, is an expert on mutuality and meaningfulness of work. Her book Meaningful Work and Workplace Democracy: a philosophy of work and a politics of meaningfulness, is published by Palgrave Macmillan

Dr Matt Wilson, Activist and anarchist and the author of Rules without rulers: The possibilities and limits of anarchism

 

Schedule

10.30 Arrival and coffee

11.00 Welcome, and context for the seminar – Daniel King, NTU

11.15 – Janet Dalziell

12.00 – Response and Q&A

12.30 – Lunch

13.30 – 15.00 – Main Panel:

13.30 – Ruth Kinna and Thomas Swann

14.00 – Ruth Yeoman

14:25 – Matt Wilson,

14.45 – Tea break

15.30 – Breakout group discussions – ‘How can Civil Society organizations work in more democratic forms?’

16.00 – Report back from groups

16.30 – Summaries and close

 

The Venue and Organisers

Newton Building, Nottingham Trent University, NG1 4FQ http://www4.ntu.ac.uk/about_ntu/document_uploads/189251.pdf

The seminar is organised by Daniel King from Nottingham Trent University. Please email daniel.king@ntu.ac.uk if you have any questions